Hey, I’m Gabriel, the sole creator of Jettomero. I’ve been working on this game for over two years and I’m so excited to be launching on Xbox One today. Jettomero has been a strange game evolving very organically throughout the development process. It has drawn from a variety of influences to form what I believe is a unique and engaging experience. Developing the game by myself was a lot of work but it let me carefully craft all aspects of the game into a consistent aesthetic and let me take creative risks that otherwise would not have been possible.

The visual style of Jettomero was a long and iterative process. I never had any real concept art for the look of the game, so I was constantly experimenting with new effects and pushing for new artistic discoveries. Early on I did decide that I wanted to go with a heavily comic-inspired feel, so artists like Mike Mignola and Jack Kirby were frequent reference points. It was a lot of fun taking these 2D styles and translating them into fully 3D worlds. Every world is procedurally generated which also means you’ll never visit the same location twice. It’s a constant journey of exploration through shapes and color.

Jettomero Screenshot

Making the soundtrack to the game was a treat for me. It’s all recorded using physical analog synthesizers and drum machines in addition to heavily processed guitars. I recorded over 80 minutes of music on the final soundtrack and it’s all there in the game to set a moody and spacey atmosphere. Artists like Boards of Canada and Phantogram were a strong inspiration but the soundtrack ends up having its own distinct style. I wanted the music in the game to create a universe where players could lose themselves and relax.

It’s been a joy to watch new players begin and instantly fall in love with the robot Jettomero’s misplaced enthusiasm and awkward clumsiness — the character is instantly relatable. Because its animation is procedurally driven by physics, every movement is organic and often toddler-like. The comedic nature of Jettomero’s locomotion works well to counter-balance the heavy themes of the game’s story. It’s slightly ironic that I made a game about an intergalactic gigantic robot to tell a very human story, but metaphors can be a powerful tool. From the beginning of development Jettomero’s charm was a crucial element in playing with both comedy and tragedy.

Jettomero Screenshot

I was never sure who I was making this game for other than myself. It has been a very personal project. But having demoed the game to players of all ages and backgrounds, it has been amazing to see how everyone seems to connect with this bizarre little project. Whether it’s the visuals or the music or the mystery that draw you in, I sincerely hope you enjoy your time with Jettomero.

 

See the rest of the story on Xbox Wire

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